French Colonial Louisiana - All Images

Louisiana as Formerly Claimed by France

This map, dated 1765, shows the Louisiana Territory as claimed by France. The map is held in The Historic New Orleans Collection archives.

Louisiana as Formerly Claimed by France

Jean Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville

Rudolph Bohunek painted this portrait of Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville c. 1910. Along with his older brother, Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville, Bienville helped establish New Orleans.

Jean Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville

Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville

Bohemian artist Rudolph Bohunek, who worked in New Orleans for four years, painted this portrait of Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville c. 1933.

Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville

The Iberville Stone

The Iberville stone was reportedly inscribed by Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville and his party in 1699, when they reached the mouth of the Mississippi River. It was recovered from the site of Fort Maurepas, the first permanent settlement in the Mississippi Valley.

The Iberville Stone

William C. C. Claiborne

After the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, William C. C. Claiborne oversaw the transfer of Louisiana from France to the United States. He was territorial governor of Louisiana after the purchase, as well as the state's first elected governor.

William C. C. Claiborne

Suite du Cours du Fleuve St. Louis

This 1760 map of the Red River traces its course from Natchitoches to the Mississippi River.

Suite du Cours du Fleuve St. Louis

Carte de la Louisiane et du cours de Mississipi dressée sur un grand nombre de mémoires entrautres sur ceux de Mr. le Maire, par Guillme. de Lisle

This 1718 French map of North America, drawn by cartographer Guillaume De Lisle, shows the routes of several early explorers. It includes De Soto's 1539 and 1540 expeditions, as well as La Salle's fatal 1687 journey.

Carte de la Louisiane et du cours de Mississipi dressée sur un grand nombre de mémoires entrautres sur ceux de Mr. le Maire, par Guillme. de Lisle

John Law, Controleur General des Finances, sous la Regence

With the support of French King Louis XIV, Scottish financier John Law assumed control of all commercial trade activity in Louisiana in 1717. His monopoly operated under the name “Company of the West” and, later, “Company of the Indies.”

John Law, Controleur General des Finances, sous la Regence

Carte reduite des costes de la Louisiane et de la Floride

French cartographer Jacques Nicolas Bellin drew this map of the Gulf Coast region in 1764.

Carte reduite des costes de la Louisiane et de la Floride

Adieu de Fontainbleau

Napoleon surrounded by saluting troops at the Chateau de Fontainebleau.

Adieu de Fontainbleau

Plan de la Ville La Nouvelle Orleans Capitale de la Province de la Louisiane

This map, "Plan de la Ville La Nouvelle Orleans Capitale de la Province de la Louisiane," dated 1755, was drawn in ink and watercolor by Jean Baptiste Simon Thierry.

Plan de la Ville La Nouvelle Orleans Capitale de la Province de la Louisiane

Le Commerce que les Indiens du Mexique Font avec les François au Port de Missisipi

French scene of trade between Frenchmen and Indians at the mouth of the Mississippi River; this engraving was distributed by agents of John Law to promote investment in the Company of the West and emigration to the Louisiana colony.

Le Commerce que les Indiens du Mexique Font avec les François au Port de Missisipi

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